949-200-9667

361 Hospital Road, Suite 533, Newport Beach, CA 92663

Skin Cancer Screening Newport Beach

Each year in the US, nearly 5 million people are treated for skin cancer. One in five Americans will develop skin cancer in the course of a lifetime. About 80% of these new skin cancer cases will be basal cell carcinoma (BCC), 16% will be squamous cell carcinoma, and 4% will be melanoma. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC), the most common form of skin cancer, is rarely fatal, but can be highly disfiguring if allowed to grow. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the second most common form of skin cancer. About two percent of squamous cell carcinoma patients – between 3,900 and 8,800 people – died from the disease in the US in 2012.

It has been estimated that regular application of sunscreen with a SPF of 30 or greater for the first 18 years of life would reduce the lifetime incidence of nonmelanoma skin cancers by 78%. Sunlight exposure is the primary cause of nonmelanoma skin cancer. Ninety percent of nonmelanoma skin cancers are due to exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun. Although the number of nonmelanoma skin cancers is staggering, both basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas have a better than 95% cure rate if detected and treated early. Even melanoma, a type of skin cancer that can spread quickly, is curable when treated early. If you notice a spot or lump that is growing, bleeding, or changing, you should make an appointment to see a dermatologist.

Patients should have complete skin examinations yearly starting in their twenties. Those with a history of skin cancer need a full skin examination on an even more regular basis (every 6 months) coupled with education about ultraviolet sun exposure and the regular use of sunscreen. Immunosuppressed patients have a higher incidence of skin cancer, especially squamous cell carcinoma, and require very careful follow-up by a dermatologist.

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